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084. Hadda


Variant Names (includes): Bagh Gai, Deh Ghundi, Gar Nau, Tepe Kafiriha, Tepe Kalan, Tepe Shutur and Tepe Zargaran.

Ningrahar Province. Nine kilometers by road south of Jalalabad

Dates: Kushan-Sassanian, 1st-7th century AD
          (numismatic, stylistic, epigraphic, documentary evidence)

       

An extensive area of stupas, monasteries and artificial caves covering approximately 15 square kilometers. All of the sites are stupa-monastery complexes, often with more than one main stupa and always with many votive stupas. Hadda produced an immense artistic wealth of mud and stucco sculpture, many gold, silver and steatite reliquaries, large numbers of coins - many of them Roman - several Kharoshthi inscriptions, and many other articles of gold, silver and precious stone. The most spectacular finds came from Tepe Kalãn, which produced a gold reliquary studded with emeralds and saphires, and from Tepe Shutur, where reliefs includes the well-known "Fish Porch" and the statue of Heracles.

Some of the caves are decorated. Near Tepe Zargaran there is a series of domed caves, some of which have stucco decoration and frescos, and containing many sculptural fragments. The Tepe Shutur remains and open-air museum were completely destroyed during the fighting between Soviet and Afghan forces in 1980.



Source: Warwick Ball, Archaeological Gazetteer of Afghanistan, 1982, n. 404

Latitude
  34° 22' N
 
  34.36667º N
Longitude
  70° 28' E
 

70.46667º E

UTM x
  634864.4493196822
UTM y
  3803787.348858488
Zone
  42N
   
MGRS
  42SXP3486403787



Hadda is located at the above coordinates near the southeast corner of JOG map
1501ANI4207_geo.pdf