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193. Shotorak

Alternate Name: Kuh-i Pahlawan

Kapisa Province. On the south bank of the Panjshir River at the foot of the Kuh-i Pahlawan, four kilometers north of Begram.

Date: Kushan, 3rd century AD (architectural, stylistic evidence)

   
         


A small Buddhist monastery complex with some seven or eight stupas. The main stupa was surrounded by a cloistered courtyard, and decorated in figures in bas-relief. Finds included many clay stupa models and many schist sculptures.

The site may have been the living quarters of the Kishan King Kanishka's Chinese hostages. Sculptures discovered at the site (carved schist standing figures and bas-relief panel sculptures) during the 1930s are considered some of the most important Buddhist artworks found in Afghanistan. The Buddha Dipankara (3rd c. AD), transferred from Shotorak to the Kabul Museum in the late 1930s, was stolen from the Museum in February 1993 and remains the most important single item still missing from the Museum's collection. It was last reported in the hands of a Japanese private collector.

Source: Warwick Ball, Archaeological Gazetteer of Afghanistan, 1982, n. 1088






 






Latitude
  35°00' N
 
  35.00° N
Longitude
  69°20' E
 

69.333333° E

UTM x
  530417.246914973
UTM y
  3873093.814723538
Zone
  42N
   
MGRS
  42SWD3041773093