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085. Tell es-Sawwan
       (ancient name unknown)

Salah ad-Din Governorate. On the east bank of the Tigris, about 11 kilometers south of Samarra

Dates: Samarran, circa 5600-5000 BC

An important Samarran-period site with early evidence of irrigation, Tell es-Sawwan is a large but low mound with evidence of a farming village 350 by 150 meters in dimension, growing wheat, barley and linseed, and using similar stone and flint tools like the Hassuna culture. But located on the edge of the reliable rainfall zone, the villagers were the first known to practice an early form of irrigation using the Tigris waters. The site also contained large empty rooms, possibly granaries and large (up to 12 rooms), well planned houses built of sun dried mud brick. The central part of the village was protected from possible invaders by a three meters deep ditch with a thick buttressed mud wall. 

Fine Samarran ware and beautiful, translucent marble vessels suggest the greater affluence provided by surpluses from irrigation agriculture. From graves of adults and children buried under the floors come terracotta and alabaster statuettes of women and men, squatting or standing, some with the coffee bean eyes and pointed heads typical of the Ubaid period

Fieldwork: Iraq Antiquities Service, 1960s

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Latitude
  34° 7' 17.7600"   
 
  34.1216º N
Longitude
  43° 54' 15.8401"   
  43.9044º E
   
UTM x
  398965.81007124623
UTM y
  3776180.784399554
Zone
  38N
   
MGRS
  38SLN9896576180
   

GoogleEarth satellite view of Tell es-Sawwan (external resource)