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092. Tell Khafajah (ancient: Tutub)


Baghdad Province. Nine miles east of Baghdad, on the Diyala River.

A Sumerian city on the Diyala River, a Tigris tributary, known for its Early Dynastic temples.

Dates: Jemdet Nasr-Early Dynastic, 3000–2500 BC

Excavations revealed several levels of two temples which had been rebuilt:  a temple built to Sin, on flat ground., and the Oval Temple, which had two oval enclosure walls surrounding a temple platform (the actual structure on top of this has not survived). The outer wall is distorted somewhat in shape to accommodate a roomy structure, perhaps the house for a priest. Before the foundations for these walls had  been laid, the entire area was excavated to a depth of nearly five meters, and filled in with clean sand, about 64,000 cubic meters, presumably a purification ritual.

Additionally, about 200 graves were excavated, mostly beneath the floors of  residential houses, ranging from simple shaft burials to walled tombs. The great quantity of pottery vessels recovered contributed to the stratigraphy the excavators developed for the Early Dynastic Period.

Fieldwork: Oriental Institute, University of Chicago, 1930’s.

Collections: Oriental Institute; Iraq National Museum

 

 

 

 









Latitude
  33° 21' 18.2448"   
 
  33.3550682° N
Longitude
  44° 33' 20.2168"   
  44.5556158° E
   
UTM x
  458654.39
UTM y
  3690739.13
Zone
  38N
   
MGRS
  38SMM5865490739
   

GoogleEarth satellite view
of Tutub (external resource)

View site photos of Tutub
(modern Tell Khafajah)
provided by The Oriental
Institute, University of Chicago