Julie Esdale, a CEMML Archaeologist on site at the Environmental Division of the U.S. Army Garrison Fort Wainwright, Alaska, works with a team of researchers that use spatial analysis (among other methods) to study the evidence left by human occupation on these lands thousands of years ago.

Charcoal, stone, and bone were left behind in this hearth 6,000 years ago at the Banjo Lake site in central Alaska. Analysis of different activity areas at the site, like this hearth area, give archaeologists clues about how long people occupied the site, where materials for making stone tools came from, and which types of animals were processed here. Together, these pieces tell a story about how people used to live at Banjo Lake thousands of years ago.

Charcoal, stone, and bone were left behind in this hearth 6,000 years ago at the Banjo Lake site in central Alaska. Analysis of different activity areas at the site, like this hearth area, give archaeologists clues about how long people occupied the site, where materials for making stone tools came from, and which types of animals were processed here. Together, these pieces tell a story about how people used to live at Banjo Lake thousands of years ago.